Schemel Evening Courses: Spring 2022

Course Fees for Non-Members are $75 per individual * Couple $125 * Remote Only $60


James Bond and the Cold War

DATES: Tuesdays, February 1, 8, 15, 22 & March 1, 8                  
TIME:  6:00 to 7:15 p.m.
LOCATION: Weinberg Memorial Library, Room 305; remote link will be emailed 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

One of the most famous fictional characters to come out of the British Isles, Ian Fleming’s superspy
James Bond, has been a constant presence in books, films, video games and merchandise for
almost seventy years. This course will put Bond back into the context of the Cold War from the
1950s to the 1980s. It will begin with an examination of Fleming’s novels and how they connect
to his own background in espionage and then move to the films from the Connery to Dalton
eras, ranging from Dr. No to The Living Daylights. 

Sean Brennan, Ph.D., Professor of History, The University of Scranton  

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Moral Citizenship: The Enlightenment Vision of the Ethical Community

DATES: Thursdays, February 3, 10, 17, 24 & March 3, 10                  
TIME:  6:00 to 7:15 p.m.
LOCATION: Weinberg Memorial Library, Room 305; remote link will be emailed 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

What does it mean to be a citizen? Upon what basis can it be said that we have an obligation
to the common good? In order to answer these perennial questions in political philosophy,
we will examine a vision of society put forward in the Enlightenment--the vision of the ethical
community. We will explore the ideas of four central Enlightenment figures: Jean-Jacques
Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Johann Fichte and Georg Hegel, paying particular attention to their
views on how moral principles inform their political ideologies.

Christopher E. Fremaux, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy, The University of Scranton 

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Police as Guardians in a Time of War

DATES: Wednesdays, February 9, 16, 23 & March 2, 9, 23
TIME:  6:00 to 7:15 p.m.
LOCATION: Weinberg Memorial Library, Room 305; remote link will be emailed 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

This course will first discuss the Anglo-Peelian roots of police as maintainers of order. Findings
from key court cases and commissions on policing will serve as an overview of the modern history
of policing in the United States. The course will conclude with present controversies in policing
and debate ideas for aligning the need for maintaining orderly communities with the mandate
of ensuring justice.

Michael J. Jenkins, Ph.D., Chair and Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Criminal Justice,
& Criminology and Executive Director, Center for the Analysis and Prevention of Crime (CAPoC)

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To register for programs, contact:    
Alicen Morrison
Schemel Forum Assistant
570-941-6206
alicen.morrison@scranton.edu
For more info on the Schemel Forum, contact:
Sondra Myers
Schemel Forum Director
570-941-4089
sondra.myers@scranton.edu