Civic Dialogue

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Spring 2022 Political Dialogue

 

In the Spring 2022 semester The University of Scranton’s Political Dialogues Working Group is hosting a political dialogue, Freedom and Our Founding: What do they mean for us today?, on Tuesday, March 22 at 7 p.m. in The Kane Forum, Edward R. Leahy, Jr. Hall. All are welcome to register for this public dialogue that will offer an opportunity to come together to share with and listen to learn from others in a dialogue on our shared value of freedom. 

These campus dialogues provided an opportunity for students to engage in a non-partisan open discussion about important issues, to explore personal values that they hold, and to listen and learn from others. Students will have a chance to engage and encounter each other's experiences and views - not debate or persuade - through structured dialogue to build understanding.  

Register for Spring 2022 Political Dialogue on Freedom

     

The University has organized similar discussions on campus since 2017 as part of an ongoing “Bursting Our Political Bubbles” Dialogue Initiative, which blends the reflective, structured dialogue methods of national non-profit Essential Partners with St. Ignatius of Loyola’s teachings of discernment and reflection. 
Questions? Contact community@scranton.edu or 570-941-4419.

 

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The University of Scranton’s Political Dialogues Working Group offered two virtual student political dialogues in the Spring 2021 semester. The first dialogue, Democracy: Are We "Brave Enough to Be It"?, was held on Wednesday, March 3 at 7 p.m. and was joined by 56 student participants that came together to share with and listen to learn from others in a dialogue on our shared value of democracy. The spring's second dialogue, Exploring "Cancel Culture," was held on Tuesday, April 20 at 7 p.m. virtually via Zoom and 50 students joined this dialogue.

These campus dialogues provided an opportunity for students to engage in a non-partisan open discussion about important issues, to explore personal values that they hold, and to listen and learn from others. Students had a chance to engage and encounter each other's experiences and views - not debate or persuade - through structured dialogue to build understanding.