World Affairs Luncheons

sponsored by MunleyLaw

All luncheons are from Noon to 1:30pm
Luncheon Fees: $20 per luncheon per person • $30 per luncheon per couple • $110 per series of 6 per person • $160 per series of 6 per couple


 

Tuesday, September 18 


Why College?
At a time of skepticism about the value of a college degree if it doesn't necessarily produce easy access to jobs, Dr. Sullivan shows that a good liberal arts/professional studies education equips students for a successful and meaningful life. 

William M. Sullivan, Ph.D., Senior Scholar at New American Colleges and Universities and Visiting Professor at the Center for the Study of Professions at Oslo and Akerskhus Universities in Norway

Edward Leahy Hall, Kane Forum, 2nd Floor; Noon to 1:30 p.m.

RSVP Here


 

matynia1.jpeg

Monday, October 1

Democracy Dies in Darkness

Professor Matynia points out that the performative dimension of democracy- being and acting like a citizen- is a local project trying to free itself from dogmatism and vertical power pressures. Whether in the Athenian agora or in Scranton's Court House Square, people gather to discuss issues of mutual interest and seek solutions. 

Elzbieta Matynia, Ph.D, Professor of Sociology and Liberal Studies and Director of the Transregional Center for Democratic Studies at the New School for Social Research

Brennan Hall, Rose Room, 509; Noon to 1:30 p.m.

RSVP Here


Wednesday, October 17 

Translating The Odyssey: How and Why

Professor Wilson will discuss her process in creating a new verse translation of Homer's The Odyssey and explain how her translation differs from others currently available in English.

Emily Wilson, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Classical Studies and Chair, Program in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory, Univeristy of Pennsylvania

Brennan Hall, Rose Room, 509; Noon to 1:30 p.m.

RSVP Here



Thursday, October 25 

You Can Do Anything

Mr. Schnurer will discuss the many ways that citizens can effect change. He notes that a previous generation of young Americans ended a war and ushered in an era of greater tolerance by changing society more than by changing politicians.


Eric Schnurer, President, Public Works, LLC

Brennan Hall, Rose Room, 509; Noon to 1:30 p.m.

RSVP Here


Wednesday, November 7 

Going to War: Who Calls the Shots?

Our Constitution authorizes Congress to declare war, yet in our history of hundreds of military encounters, it has happened rarely. Since World War II, there has been no congressional declaration of war, in spite of major conflicts throughout the world, including: Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, Libya, Afghanistan, and Syria. We will discuss the role of Congress, the President, and the Supreme Court throughout our history in the decision to go to war. 

Morey Myers, L.L.B., Of Counsel, Myers, Brier and Kelly

Brennan Hall, Rose Room, 509; Noon to 1:30 p.m.

RSVP Here


Tuesday, November 13

Cybercrime: A Global Weapon of Mass Destruction

It has become far too easy to have your Social Security, bank account, passport and credit card numbers stolen by hackers located throughout the world. As a result you can lose access to your savings and investments, your financial records, your vote, your tax refunds, title to your house and car. How did this happen and what can be done? We will discuss what policies and programs must be adopted to fight worldwide cyber criminals. 

 

Michael Greenberger, J.D., Founder and Director, University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security and Law Professor

Brennan Hall, Rose Room, 509; Noon to 1:30 p.m.

RSVP Here


Spring 2018 World Affairs Luncheons

 

Friday, February 9, The Citizen's Share
Joseph Blasi,
Ed.D., J. Robert Beyster Distinguished Professor, Rutgers University School of Management and Labor Relations and Rutgers Business School, New Brunswick
Listen to the Lecture Here

Monday, March 5, Understanding the Americans Who Joined Isis 
Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, Ph.D., Research Director, Program on Extremism, The George Washington University
Listen to the Lecture Here

Monday, March 19, Shared Past, Divergent Courses: Zionism and Palestinian Nationalism, Part 3, The Israel-Palestinian Conflict, 1979- Present
David N. Myers, Ph.D., President/CEO of the Center for Jewish History and Sady and Ludwig Kahn Professor of Jewish History, UCLA

Hussein Ibish, Ph.D., Senior Resident Scholar, Arab Gulf States Institute, Washington, DC
Listen to the Lecture Here

Tuesday, April 3, JFK, LBJ and the Paradox of Vietnam
Fredrik Logevall, Ph.D., Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs, Harvard University
Listen to the Lecture here

Wednesday, April 11, Resisting Threats to Democracy: Lessons from Machiavelli
Erica Benner, Ph.D., Fellow in Political Philosophy, Yale University/Fellow, Institute for Advanced Study, Central European University
Listen to the lecture here

Thursday, April 26, Strengthening the Global Health System: Lessons Learned from Africa
Felix C. Rwabukwisi, M.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Clinical Science, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine
Listen to the lecture here

 

To register for programs, contact:    
Alicen Morrison
Schemel Forum Assistant
570-941-6206
alicen.morrison@scranton.edu
For more info on the Schemel Forum, contact:
Sondra Myers
Schemel Forum Director
570-941-4089
sondra.myers@scranton.edu