Events

The "Scranton's Story, Our Nation's Story" project launched in October 2021 with events focusing on the inaugural them "Portrait of Scranton, Portrait of a Nation" including a keynote lecture with Scranton-born prolific author Jay Parini and a Jane Jacobs Walk focusing on Scranton PA's downtown Lackawanna Avenue. Events continued through the winter of 2022 with the project's second theme, "The U.S. Citizen and the American Foudning" featuring a book discussion, humanities discussion with scholars Annelein De Dijn and Aziz Rana, and a community dialogue. The project continues with its third theme, "The Indegenious History of NEPA" this spring. Upcoming events will continued to be added to this page for the duration of the project through the fall of 2023. For specific event details and links to event recordings, please visit our individual Theme Pages linked on our project homepage.

Upcoming Events

Removal and the Right to Remain in the United States

On Wednesday, May 18, 2022 at 5 pm in the Henkelman Room in the Albright Memorial Library in Scranton, PA, there will be a Humanities Lecture and Discussion with scholar Samantha Seeley, Ph.D., an Assitant Professor of History at Richmond University and author. Her book, Race, Removal, and the Right to Remain: Migration and the Making of the Early United States, highlights early efforts at U.S. nation building and the use of migration to construct a white republic. Situating the struggles of Native and Black Americans into the larger story of the early U.S, Seeley argues for a more inclusive way to tell the story of forced removal and its implications on early U.S. statehood. 

Registration is required at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RemovalRight2022 

View Removal and the Right to Remain Event Page

Recent Events

Murder and Mercy: A Colonial Encounter in the Susquehanna Valley

On Wednesday, May 11, 2022 at 5 pm in the PNC Auditorium, Loyola Science Center 133, The University of Scranton, there was a Humanities Lecture and Discussion with scholar Nicole Eustace, PhD, a Professor of History at NYU. Dr. Eustace is a prolific author and her talk ““Murder and Mercy”: A Colonial Encounter in the Susquehanna Valley” highlighting the central themes of her latest book, Covered with Night, which explores competing interpretations of justice and morality on the Pennsylvania frontier. She demonstrates the complex layers and textures of everyday life as colonists encountered Native peoples in eastern Pennsylvania. Covered with Night was a finalist for the 2021 National Book Award and won the 2022 Pulitzer Prize in History. 

View Murder and Mercy Event Page

Community Dialogue on “Freedom and Our Founding: What do they mean for us today?"

Community Dialogue on “Freedom and Our Founding: What do they mean for us today?" in The Kane Forum, Edward R. Leahy, Jr. Hall, The University of Scranton. 
University and Community members joined for this
 dialogue event that involved facilitated small-group structured dialogues allowing participants to reflect on freedom and the founding and our role as citizens in a democracy. Participants had a chance to consider brief excerpts from founding related readings, share their own experience and perspectives on issues that relate to freedom and equality today, listen to others’ views and engage in conversation. 

This event is a collaboration of The University of Scranton with the Black Scranton Project, Lackawanna County Arts and Culture Department, The Lackawanna Historical Society, Scranton Public Library, The Greater Scranton MLK Commission, Scranton Area Ministerium, and WVIA with the support of additional project partner organizations.   

View the Dialogue Event Page

 

Humanities Lecture “Freedom and Our Founding: What do they mean for us today?"

On Tuesday, Mar. 1 at 5 pm a Humanities Lecture on "Freedom and Our Founding: What do they mean for us today?" with audience Q&A was held featuring scholars Annelien de Dijn, author, Freedom: An Unruly History, and Aziz Rana, author, The Two Faces of American FreedomThis lecture focused on the evolution of the concept of freedom, how it has been understood and interpreted by the founders of our nation, and what this means for our democracy as we approach our nation’s 250th anniversary.  

This event is a collaboration of The University of Scranton with the Lackawanna County Arts and Culture Department, The Lackawanna Historical Society, Scranton Public Library, Greater Scranton MLK Commission, Scranton Area Ministerium, and WVIA with the support of additional project partner organizations.

View Freedom Lecture Event Page  

Book Discussion on “Freedom: An Unruly History”

On Thursday, Feb. 3 from 5 - 6:15 pm in the Henkelman Room at the Albright Memorial Library in Scranton, PA and via Zoom, a Book Discussion on excerpts of “Freedom: An Unruly History” by Annelien de Dijn was led by Dr. Matt Meyer, The University of Scranton, Professor of Philosophy. 

The discussion group involved excerpted readings of the book, "Freedom: An Unruly History," by scholar Annelien de Dijn. The discussion explored the American founding’s idea of freedom and how freedom intersects with issues of equality, liberty and citizenship in ways that are relevant for us today – from matters of race relations, immigration, and women’s rights to health care, Covid-19, and more.

This event is a collaboration of The University of Scranton and the Scranton Public Library, with the support of additional project partner organizations.  

View the Book Discussion Event Page

Scranton & the Nation: Who Are We and Who Do We Aspire to Be?

On Monday, Dec. 6, 2021 from 5 - 6:30 p.m. in the PNC Board Room, Brennan Hall, at The University of Scranton, a special Roundtable Discussion, "Scranton & the Nation: Who Are We and Who Do We Aspire to Be?" was held. This roundtable event featured opening presentations by resource speakers followed by a group discussion considering the role of our city in the nation’s progress, or as urbanist Jane Jacobs wrote: “what Scranton is, has been, and can be.” as we look ahead to the 250th anniversary of the United States. Participants reflected on excerpts from Glenna Lang’s book Jane Jacobs’ First City and Our America: Who are We? edited by Sondra Myers.

Resource Speakers for this event included: Alejandra Marroquin, Immigrant Inclusion Committee co-chair, Maureen McGuigan, Deputy Director of Arts & Culture for Lackawanna County, and Larry West, City of Scranton Business Administrator, with co-moderators Julie Schumacher Cohen and Sondra Myers, both of The University of Scranton. 

This event is a collaboration of The University of Scranton's Schemel Forum and Office of Community and Government Relations with the support of the Scranton Immigrant Inclusion Committee, Lackawanna County Department of Arts & Culture, the City of Scranton and additional project partner organizations including WVIA.

View the Roundtable Event Page

Jane Jacobs Walk Downtown Scranton's Lackawanna Avenue - a Living City

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On Saturday, Oct. 23 a Jane Jacobs Walk was held as a part of the first "Scranton's Story, Our Nation's Story" project theme, "Portrait of Scranton, Portrait of a Nation." This tour encompassed different parts of downtown Scranton, observing architecture, streetscape, and city life with a focus on Lackawanna Avenue and drawing on themes in the recently published Jane Jacobs’s First City by Glenna Lang to consider questions around Scranton’s history, development, place and identity. The walk will began at AFA Gallery- 101 Penn Ave, Scranton, PA and was lead by Wayne Evans, Broker/Owner Wayne Evans Realty and former Mayor of Scranton. 

This event is a collaboration of The University of Scranton and the Center for the Living City, with the support of the Scranton Fringe Festival and additional project partner organizations.  

View Jane Jacobs Walk Event Page

Scranton in the Popular Imagination

theme-1_poster_final.jpgOn Tuesday, Oct. 19 "Scranton in the Popular Imagination," the inaugural event for the "Scranton's Story, Our Nation's Story Project." was held at 7 pm at the Scranton Cultural Center at 420 N. Washington Avenue in downtown Scranton, PA. This event featured a keynote by Jay Parini, Scranton-born prolific author and D. E. Axinn Professor of English and Creative Writing, Middlebury College, and panel discussion with humanities faculty and community organization leaders from Northeastern Pennsylvania that explored the forces that contributed to the celebrity of Scranton as “The All American City,” and considered how and if Scranton in the popular and national imagination reflects the Scranton of today. Respondent panelists included: Glynis Johns, Founder & CEO, Black Scranton Project; Joseph Kraus, Ph.D. Professor & Department Chair English and Theatre, The University of Scranton; and Maria MacDonald, Executive Director, Center for the Living City with moderator Hank Willenbrink, Ph.D., Theatre Program Director and Associate Professor in the Ddepartment of English and Theatre, The University of Scranton. This event was a part of this project's first theme,"Portrait of Scranton, Portrait of a Nation."

This event is a collaboration of The University of Scranton with Black Scranton Project, Center for the Living City, Lackawanna County Department of Arts &. Culture, Lackawanna Historical Society, and WVIA with the support of additional project partner organizations. 

View the Scranton in the Popular Imagination Event Page