Hydration Challenge

Don't Wait! Hydrate! 3/22-4/12

 Hydration Challenge- March 22nd- April 12th

Register Deadline: March 22nd by Noon

Welcome to the Employee Wellness Hydration Challenge! The participants will be challenged to track their water intake and be given a custom-made University of Scranton Employee Wellness water bottle to help them along the way

According to the American Heart Association and the CDC, studies have shown that water keeps the mind and body healthy, transporting nutrients, removing waste, regulating body temperature and keeping the cells working. Getting enough water every day is important for your health. Drinking water can prevent dehydration, a condition that can cause unclear thinking, result in mood change, cause your body to overheat, and lead to medical issues.

At the end of the Hydration Challenge, you will receive an email (4/9) with a link to complete an end of program survey that will allow you to be entered for a grand prize raffle. Due by Monday, (4/12) at noon. Raffles will be drawn at the end of the program.  

 This program is designed to motivate and encourage you to be mindful to drink more water throughout your day that will carry many health benefits. Free Employee Wellness Water Bottle given AFTER you register.

Register Here

Although the total amount varies by age, gender and body composition, our bodies are 55 percent to 78 percent water. The Food and Nutrition Board at the federal Institute of Medicine offers an estimate on a healthy balance of water for adult men and women. It suggests men have about 3.7 liters daily. That’s about 15, 8-ounce glasses. Women should have about 2.7 liters, or 11 glasses. More details below in How Much Should I Drink?

Printable Water Log Calendar

  • Program Detailsplus or minus

    Step 1:  Register

    Register deadline: Monday, March 22nd by Noon:  

    3 easy ways to register:  

    1. Click Here 
    2. Scan Code  
    3. Visit us in the Long Center Lobby on 3/17 from 12-2pm 

    Sign-up by Monday, March 22nd by noon and receive a custom-made University of Scranton Employee Wellness Water Bottle- (The choice of pick up or delivery will be on the registration form). 

    Step 2: Fill up your bottle with water and get drinking! (you will receive a free custom-made University of Scranton Employee Wellness water bottle after you register) 

     We’ve all heard that 8 glasses of water each day is best. But the truth is, how much water you need varies. Check out some basic guidelines below on the Hydration Challenge page: How Much Water Should I Drink?

    Step 3: Check you email 

    There will be great tipsinformation and motivation. Emails will also have a Water Log to help track your daily intake throughout the challenge. 

    Step 4:  Track

    Track your daily water intake by using the printable-Water Log or download a free app. 

    Printable Water Log Calendar-This is for you only. Print out the Water Log and keep it at your desk and track as you sip throughout the day.

    Step 5: Certify & Complete end of program survey

    At the end of the Hydration Challenge, you will receive an email (4/9) with a link to complete an end of program survey that will allow you to be entered for a grand prize raffle. Due by Monday, (4/12) at noon. Raffles will be drawn at the end of the program.  

    Step 6:  Keep Going!

    Continue to drink water throughout your day and reap the benefits that you learned throughout the program! 

     

     

  • How Much Water Should I Drink?plus or minus

    How Much Water Does Your Body Need Each Day? 

    We’ve all heard that 8 glasses of water each day is best. But the truth is, how much water you need varies. But there are some basic guidelines: 

    • The U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine determined that an adequate daily fluid intake is: 

      • About 15.5 cups (3.7 liters) 125 ounces of fluids a day for men 
      • About 11.5 cups (2.7 liters) 91 ounces of fluids a day for women 

      These recommendations cover fluids from water, other beverages and food. About 20% of daily fluid intake usually comes from food and the rest from drinks.  (Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic)

    • * You should check with your doctor if you are not sure about the right amount for you.

      Even a healthy person's water needs will vary, especially if you're losing water through sweat because you're exercising, or because you're outside on a hot day. If you're wondering how much water you should drink on those occasions, speak with your doctor, but a general rule of thumb for healthy people is to drink two to three cups of water per hour, or more if you're sweating heavily. (Harvard Health)

  • Benefits of Drinking Waterplus or minus

     According to the CDC, getting enough water every day is important for your health. Drinking water can prevent dehydration, a condition that can cause unclear thinking, result in mood change, cause your body to overheat, and lead to constipation and kidney stones.

     

    Benefits of Drinking Water (Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic and Harvard Health)

    Water keeps every system in the body functioning properly.  Water is your body's principal chemical component and makes up about 50% to 70% of your body weight. Your body depends on water to survive. Water has many important jobs, such as:

    • Aids in digestion and gets rid of waste.
    • Helps your joints. Water lubricates them.
    • Makes saliva (which you need to eat).
    • Balance your body’s chemicals. Your brain needs it to create hormones and neurotransmitters.
    • Cushions your bones and joints.
    • Regulates your body temperature.
    • Carries nutrients and oxygen to your cells.
    • Flushes bacteria from your bladder.
    • Prevents constipation.
    • Normalizes blood pressure.
    • Stabilizes heartbeat.
    • Protects organs and tissues.
    • Helps to maintain electrolyte (sodium) balance.

    For example, water helps your: 

    • Blood: Water ensures that your blood is just the right consistency to carry oxygen- and nutrient-rich blood to the areas that need it, including your brain, heart, kidneys and muscles.
    • Digestive system: “Dehydration is an easily reversible cause of constipation.”
    • Joints: Think of your joints like the gears of your car — they need to be well-lubricated to work and last.
    • Kidneys: Drinking adequate amounts of water can prevent kidney damage and disorders.
    • Skin: For clear, wrinkle-free skin, H2O can be just as effective as expensive anti-aging creams and lotions. It can also stave off certain skin disorders.
    • Teeth: Water keeps your mouth clean and lowers your risk for tooth decay.

    There’s also research that water may:

    • Boost exercise performance.
    • Help with weight loss.
    • Reduce allergy and asthma symptoms.

     

    According to the CDC, getting enough water every day is important for your health. Drinking water can prevent dehydration, a condition that can cause unclear thinking, result in mood change, cause your body to overheat, and lead to constipation and kidney stones. 

    Remember...your body needs more water when you are:

    • In hot climates
    • More physically active
    • Running a fever
    • Having diarrhea or vomiting

     Giving your body enough fluids to carry out those tasks means that you're staying hydrated.

     

  • Hydration Tips and Printable Water Log Calendarplus or minus

    Tips to Drink More Water (CDC)

    • Carry a water bottle with you and refill it throughout the day (Everyone should have a brand new Employee Wellness Water Bottle)
    • Freeze some freezer safe water bottles. Take one with you for ice-cold water all day long.
    • Choose water over sugary drinks.
    • Opt for water when eating out. You’ll save money and reduce calories.
    • Serve water during meals.
    • Add a wedge of lime or lemon to your water. This can help improve the taste and help you drink more water than you usually do. 

    Tips if you Do Not Like Plain Water


    • Lemon or Orange wedges 
    • Raspberries and blueberries 
    • Watermelon cubes and mini key limes cut in half 
    • Splash of unsweetened juice 
    • Thinly sliced cucumber and fresh mint leaves 
    • Frozen fruit 
    • Sugar free packets  

    Helpful hints to be successful to increase your water intake

    • Set a water schedule 
    • Track water intake on phone/laptop/ or printable water log calendar
    • Download free apps that remind you to take a sip, and track how much water you are drinking. 

    Best Water Apps (Free) 

    • Daily Water Tracker Reminder   
    • Hydro Coach 
    • My Water Balance 
    • Hydrate Daily 
    • WaterMinder 
    • Water Drink Reminder 
    • Plant Nanny-Water Reminder
    • Aqualert: Water Tracker Daily 
    • My Water & Drink Reminder 
    • Water Time Pro 
                 
  • What is Dehydration?plus or minus

    Dehydration

    Getting enough water every day is important for your health. Drinking water can prevent dehydration, a condition that can cause unclear thinking, result in mood change, cause your body to overheat, and lead to constipation and kidney stones. (CDC)

     

    What is Dehydration (Cleveland Clinic)? 

    Dehydration is the absence of a sufficient amount of water in your body. The best way to beat dehydration is to drink before you get thirsty. If you’re thirsty, you’re already mildly dehydrated, and that can cause symptoms like headache, fatigue, dizziness and more. Dehydration can contribute to life-threatening illnesses like heatstroke. 

    Dehydration happens when you don’t drink enough water, or when you lose water quickly through, for example, sweating, vomiting and/or diarrhea. Certain medications such as diuretics (water pills) can result in increased urination and dehydration. 

    What are the signs and symptoms of dehydration? What does dehydration feel like? (Cleveland Clinic and Mayo Clinic)

    If you suspect that you or someone else is severely dehydrated, seek immediate medical attention.

    Signs of dehydration include:

    • Headache, delirium, confusion.
    • Tiredness (fatigue).
    • Dizziness, weakness, light-headedness.
    • Dry mouth and/or a dry cough. Extreme thirst
    • High heart rate but low blood pressure.
    • Loss of appetite but maybe craving sugar.
    • Flushed (red) skin. Swollen feet. Muscle cramps.
    • Heat intolerance, or chills.
    • Constipation.
    • Less frequent urination
    • Dark-colored urine. Your urine should be a pale clear color.

    The best way to beat dehydration is to drink before you get thirsty. If you wait until after you're thirsty, you're already dehydrated.

    In what other ways does dehydration affect me?

    Dehydration does more than you might expect. If affects you not only physically (note the signs stated above), but mentally and emotionally as well. If you’re dehydrated, you may feel:

    Mental affects: Confused

    Emotional affects: Cranky or anxious.

     

    When to see a doctor

    Call your family doctor if you or a loved one:

    • Has had diarrhea for 24 hours or more
    • Is irritable or disoriented and much sleepier or less active than usual
    • Can't keep down fluids
    • Has bloody or black stool

     

    Symptoms of mild to moderate dehydration might include:

    • Constipation.
    • Dizziness.
    • Dry mouth.
    • Fatigue.
    • Muscle cramps.

    More severe dehydration constitutes a medical emergency that requires immediate attention, and can include any or all of these as well as:

    • Abdominal pain.
    • Confusion.
    • Lethargy.

     

    Tips for avoiding dehydration (Harvard Health)

    There are many reasons why water is still the better choice. Remember, sugary drinks can lead to weight gain and inflammation, which can increase your risk for developing diseases such as diabetes. Too much caffeine can give you the jitters or keep you from sleeping. And, alcohol intake should be limited to one drink per day for women, and 1-2 drinks per day for men.

    To ward off dehydration, drink fluids gradually, throughout the day. An easy way to do this is to have a drink at each meal.

    And know that you also get fluids from water-rich foods, such as salads, fruit, and applesauce.