Dr. Barry X. Kuhle's Home Page

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Professor Kuhle received his baccalaureate from Binghamton University in 1997 and his doctorate in evolutionary psychology from The University of Texas at Austin in 2002. He teaches Evolutionary Psychology, Fundamentals of Psychology, and Statistics in the Behavioral Sciences. His research focuses on the evolved psychological mechanisms that underlie sex differences in humor production, mate preferences, and romantic jealousy. He is also interested in (a) the evolution and development of both sexual fluidity and reproductive senescence in women and (b) sex differences in how women and men advertise themselves and what they report seeking on Tinder.

Representative research (*denotes student co-author):

Kuhle, B. X., & *Brezinski, S. (2016). Alloparenting and female same-sex behavior. In: T. K. Shackelford & V. A.
Weekes-Shackelford (Eds.), Encyclopedia of evolutionary psychological science. Berlin: Springer. 

Kuhle, B. X. (2015). On the origin of an evolutionary psychologist. In J. G. Irons & R. L. Miller (Eds.), Academic advising: A handbook for advisors and students, volume 2: A guide to the sub-disciplines (pp. 24-26). Society for the Teaching of Psychology.

Kuhle, B. X., Melzer, D. K., *Cooper, C. A., *Merkle, A. J., *Pepe, N. A., *Ribanovic, A., *Verdesco, A. L., & *Wettstein, T. L. (2015). The “birds and the bees” differ for boys and girls: Sex differences in the nature of sex talks. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 9, 107-115.

Kuhle, B. X., & Radtke, S. (2013). Born both ways: The alloparenting hypothesis for sexual fluidity in women. Evolutionary Psychology, 11, 304-323.

Kuhle, B. X. (2012). It’s funny because it’s true (because it evokes our evolved psychology). Review of General Psychology, 16, 177-186.

Kuhle, B. X. (2012). Evolutionary psychology is compatible with equity feminism, but not with gender feminism. Evolutionary Psychology, 10, 39-43.

Kuhle, B. X. (2011). Did you have sex with him? Do you love her? An in vivo test of sex differences in jealous interrogations. Personality and Individual Differences, 51, 1044-1047.