Commons

Did You Know...

Fact Talking Point
At least 25% of students who withdrew, transferred, or were dismissed from the University after their first year of college (2010-2011) left the University in part due to alcohol or substance abuse challenges. Talk with students about how heavy episodic binge drinking is associated with increased probability of academic failure and early departure (Jennison & Johnson, 2004). Alcohol is related to nearly 1/3 of all student attrition (Outside the Classroom, 2006).
University of Scranton students perceive that more than 95% of their peers have consumed alcohol within the past 30 days. In actuality, approximately 75% of all Scranton students consumed alcohol on at least one occasion within the past 30 days (ACHA-NCHA, Spring 2009). Students often perceive that all of their peers are engaged in alcohol consumption when in fact this is not the case. The ACHA-NCHA survey administered in Spring 2009 revealed that in any given month, approximately 25% of students abstain from alcohol consumption. talk with students about perception versus reality, surrounding themselves with peers who will be good influences on them when it comes to alcohol, and the Late Night at Scranton events.

Approximately 35% of first-year students at the University acknowledge that they missed class, performed poorly on an academic assignment, and/or got behind in school as a result of their alcohol consumption (Outside the Classroom, Alcohol.Edu, October 2011).

55.5% of faculty and staff members at Scranton are aware of students whose academic performance was affected by alcohol or other drug use (Core Faculty and Staff Environmental Alcohol and Other Drug Survey, 2011).

Talk with students about the many negative short- and long-term consequences experienced by students as a result of alcohol use or abuse. These consequences are experienced both inside and outside of the classroom (i.e., academic success, health, personal relationships, disciplinary and/or arrest record).
Approximately 40-45% of all first-year students at the University identify as non-drinkers (Outside the Classroom, Alcohol.Edu, October 2011). Students often perceive that all of their peers are engaged in alcohol consumption when in fact this is not the case. A recent survey indicates that a large percentage of first-year students identify as non-drinkers. Talk with students about perception versus reality, surrounding themselves with peers who will be good influences on them when it comes to alcohol, and the Late Night at Scranton events.