Performance Music at Scranton Presents World-Famous Organist In Recital

02/27/12

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Renowned organist, arranger, composer and producer Timothy Brumfield will perform on The University of Scranton’s restored Austin Opus 301 Symphonic Organ, which is one of a very few authentic examples of early 20th-century American symphonic organs in existence. The performance, which is free of charge and open to the public, will be held Friday, March 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the Houlihan-Mclean Center.

Renowned organist, arranger, composer and producer Timothy Brumfield will perform on The University of Scranton’s historic pipe organ on Friday, March 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the Houlihan-Mclean Center. Admission is free and open to the public.

Brumfield currently serves as director of music and organist at Christ Church Riverdale in the Bronx, New York. Previously, he served as cathedral organist at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City from 2002-2009. As organist at the world’s largest Gothic Cathedral, he performed with distinguished artists such as pianist Dave Brubeck, drummer Max Roach, and legendary folk singer Judy Collins, among others. 

Brumfield has been featured on National Public Radio (NPR) and toured with the Cathedral Choristers both in the United States and throughout England with performances at the famed Salisbury and St. Paul’s Cathedrals. He has been a member of the Grammy Award-winning Paul Winter Consort since 1998 and has toured Europe performing in Denmark, Italy and in France, including at the world famous Notre Dame Cathedral. He can be heard on Heartscapes Records.

Born in Richmond, Ky., Brumfield was introduced to music at the age of three by his father, landed his first professional job as a church pianist at thirteen, and is now considered one of the world’s finest organ improvisers. He tours regularly as a solo organist and pianist, and is often asked to lecture on the art of improvisation. He recently received the distinguished award of Honorary Fellow of the National College of Music in London.

For his March 2 performance, Brumfield will perform on the University’s Austin Opus 301 Symphonic Organ, which is one of a very few authentic examples of early 20th-century American symphonic organs. Built in 1910 for the church that occupied the building that would later become the University’s concert hall, the 3,178-pipe instrument was meticulously restored by Patrick J. Murphy & Associates in 2005.

For additional information, contact Cheryl Y. Boga, director of performance music, at music@scranton.edu, or visit www.scranton.edu/music.


Press Release Contact:
Stan Zygmunt
Director of News & Media Relations
The University of Scranton
(570)-941-7662