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Tony Award-winner and Native Scrantonian Receives Distinguished Author Award

Tony Award-winner and Native Scrantonian Receives Distinguished Author Award
The Friends of the Weinberg Memorial Library presented the 2016 Royden B. Davis, S.J., Distinguished Author Award to Scranton native Stephen Karam. From left: Charles Kratz, dean of the library and information fluency at the University; Sondra Myers, director of the University’s Schemel Forum; Karam; University of Scranton President Kevin P. Quinn, S.J.; and Joseph Dreisbach, Ph.D., interim provost and senior vice president of academic affairs.

The Friends of the Weinberg Memorial Library presented the 2016 Royden B. Davis, S.J., Distinguished Author Award to Scranton native Stephen Karam, best known for his Tony Award-winning play, The Humans, which centers on a Thanksgiving dinner in a New York City apartment hosted by a former Scrantonian for relatives who traveled from Northeastern Pennsylvania for the holiday.

Karam, also a Pulitzer Prize for Drama finalist for his Sons of the Prophet, is a native Scrantonian whom University President Kevin P. Quinn, S.J., called a “faithful advocate of the liberal arts” who “spent his career extolling the virtues of a liberal education.”

The Distinguished Author Award series benefits the Friends of the Library Endowment Fund, which supports special gifts for the Weinberg Memorial Library collections and services. 

At the presentation, University benefactor and director of the Schemel Forum Sondra Myers introduced Karam, who shared a host of growing-up-in-Scranton memories with the packed house, ranging from enjoying Dime Night at Nay Aug Park and burgers at Chick’s Diner or The Glider Diner to being “the worst player in Green Ridge baseball history.”

In addition to the positive memories, Karam paid special tribute to life’s “darker moments,” which he called crucial to the human condition.

“My path to a career in the arts wasn’t easy or overnight, and the truth is that most artists’ work stems from their pain and adversity,” he said.

Read the full article, here

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