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Dani Arigo, Ph.D., Discusses her Research

Dr. Arigo asks: How do we understand what’s happening naturally and not going so well in the natural environment, and how do we translate that into health intervention? We can design health programs and use this information to our advantage.

She researches the ways that women use information from their social environment to inform their health behaviors. “There are even implications on social media,” she said.

“For example, if you’re really motivated by seeing groups of other women working out together, then you’re the type of person who could benefit from a social program, app, or online social network. But if you prefer to work out alone, then that’s not the best type of program for you,” she said.

She’s particularly interested in body satisfaction among women and how women often do not prioritize self-care. Most women don’t prioritize their own health, particularly older women, she said, as they are more focused on taking care of others. Perhaps counterintuitively, “prioritizing our own health leaves us better able to take care of others. Then everyone wins.”

Read the USA Today story about Arigo’s research here.

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