Information Literacy Stipends 2005

The inaugural call for proposals resulted in the awarding of six Information Literarcy Stipends:


Students in Animal Nutrition and Metabolism (BIOL 255), taught by Dr. Gary Kwiecinski, are learning that scientific nutritional information exists in a variety of types and formats. Students will be producing a topic paper that summarizes current knowledge on a specific nutrient or a nutrition-related topic. They will be learning how to differentiate between primary and secondary sources and how to synthesize summaries from raw data in primary sources into a concise summary.

Collaborating Librarian is Betsey Moylan, Associate Professor.
Read Dr. Kwiecinski's final report.


Students in Marine Ecology (BIOL 273), taught by Dr. Janice Voltzow will be expanding their skills in information literacy through three writing exercises. The first focuses on avoiding plagiarism and uses examples to help students critically read a scientific paper and summarize it in their own words. The second exercise helps students assess the value and appropriateness of sources by comparing a pair of articles on a similar topic, one from a peer-reviewed scientific journal and another from a magazine or website. In the third exercise, students will apply these skills to evaluate the current state of marine fisheries and aquaculture. Each student will select one species for which there is a significant marine fishery or aquaculture market and will research and write a paper to assess the resources available about that fishery, the reliability and usefulness of those resources, and a critical assessment of the fishery itself.

Collaborating Librarian is Katie Duke, Associate Professor.
Read Dr. Voltzow's final report.


Students in Elements of Chemistry (CHEM 100) class, taught by Dr. Jennifer Tripp, will be working in pairs to locate original research articles mentioned in the New York Times. The goal of this activity is not only to show students how to access original research online and in the library, but also how to critically evaluate the quality of science information they read in the news.  This methodology can be applied to future research projects and demonstrates the scientific method in action.

Collaborating Librarian is Katie Duke, Associate Professor.
Read Dr. Tripp's final report.


The students in Reading in the Secondary Schools (EDUC 340) course, taught by Dr. Patricia Gross, Associate Professor, will examine the wide range of literacy they will employ in teaching across academic disciplines.  They will practice how to search, access, and evaluate information effectively so that they will be able to teach these skills to their future students.  They will write annotated bibliographies of the sources they use and present findings to the class.

Collaborating Librarian is Betsey Moylan, Associate Professor.
Read Dr. Gross's final report.


Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family (NURS 373), taught by Dr. Marian Farrell, is currently running in the spring 2005 semester. Case management is a collaborative process that includes assessment, planning, implementation, coordination, monitoring, and evaluation of health care services. The purpose of the writing assignment is to increase students' knowledge of the health care needs of pregnant women and to connect them to community resources and services by using a case management model of care. In addition, students will also demonstrate increased information literacy skills. The completed writing assignments will be submitted in an electronic format to Turnitin.com prior to a final grade.

Collaborating Librarian is Katie Duke, Associate Professor.
Read Dr. Farrell's final report.


Dr. Harry Dammer, plans to design a self-administered tutorial, incorporating information literacy skills, for all students taking the Introductory Sociology Course (SOC 110) and the Introductory Criminal Justice course (CJ 110). The design for the project will be completed during the summer of 2005 for implementation during fall 2005 courses.

Collaborating Librarian is Clara Hudson, Assistant Professor.
Read Dr. Dammer's final report.