Counseling and Human Services Bachelor of Science Program

The Counseling and Human Services (CHS) curriculum is designed to develop in students the values, knowledge and skills necessary to work with people in a variety of settings and situations across the lifespan. The program seeks to train counseling and human service professionals who are self-reflective practitioners, competent care-givers, and community leaders. A concentration in Rehabilitation Services is available.

Program Director
Philosophical Statement
Accreditation & Certification
Service Learning
Concentration in Rehabilitation
Internship Experiences
Student Resources
CHSA
Program Description
Mission Statement
Unique Dimensions
Major Courses
Accelerated B.S./M.S. Program
Employment Outlook & Opportunities
Honor Society
Program Accreditation Information

PROGRAM DIRECTOR

Paul Datti, Ph.D., CRC, HS-BCP
Program Director, Counseling and Human Services Program
451 McGurrin Hall
E-mail: paul.datti@scranton.edu
Office phone: (570) 941-4127
Department phone: (570) 941-4236

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PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The undergraduate program in Counseling and Human Services is part of the Department of Counseling and Human Services which is part of the College of Professional Studies (CPS). The Counseling and Human Services program has a multi-disciplinary perspective with special emphasis placed on the achievement of excellence in academic and professional competencies. The Counseling and Human Services program and the department are committed to the enhancement of human development across the lifespan. Through the interplay of counseling, skill development, social work systems, rehabilitation services, field work experiences, and internships, the program prepares students for work in a variety of settings (agency, school, etc.) as counseling and human service professionals who situate their work within cultural, family, and community (local, regional, national, and global) contexts.

The Counseling and Human Services program leads to a Bachelor of Science degree that prepares students for graduate studies or for entry-level positions in the field of Counseling and Human Services following graduation. In concert with the mission of the University to provide a liberal arts foundation, the CHS program prepares students to develop the necessary skills for the delivery of culturally competent human services. Core requirements in the major emphasize values, knowledge and skills common to all fields of human services, while electives allow students to develop competence in assisting specific populations. For more information regarding core courses and electives within the Counseling and Human Services program, visit the CHS Program Manual.

The CHS degree consists of a 127 credit curriculum including 58 credits from CHS major and cognate courses.  In addition to the University of Scranton’s requirements for graduation, students pursuing the CHS degree must maintain a minimum of C in all major and cognate courses for graduation. Students in the major are required to complete 6 credits of internship experience totaling 350 hours. All students must also complete a minimum of 70 service-learning hours (separate from the internships) plus PCPS TAPESTRY program requirements in order to graduate.
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PHILOSOPHICAL STATEMENT OF PROGRAM

The philosophy of the Counseling and Human Services program integrates the missions of the CHS Department, College of Professional Studies, and University of Scranton which embrace a tradition of excellence in training professionals grounded in theory and practice. The curriculum is designed to develop in students the self-awareness, knowledge, and culturally relevant skills necessary to work with a diverse clientele in a variety of settings and situations. The philosophical underpinning of the curriculum also focuses on the development of self-reflective practitioners, competent care givers, and community leaders. The conceptual framework of the CHS curriculum emphasizes the development of human services professionals who will be responsive to contemporary needs.
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MISSION STATEMENT

The Counseling and Human Services (CHS) undergraduate program at the University of Scranton seeks to train counseling and human service professionals who are self-reflective practitioners, competent care-givers, and community leaders. The program has a multi-disciplinary perspective with special emphasis placed on the achievement of excellence in academic and professional competencies.

The Counseling and Human Services program and the department are committed to the enhancement of human development across the lifespan. Through the interplay of counseling, skill development, social work systems, rehabilitation services, field work experiences, and internships, the program prepares students for work in a variety of settings (agency, school, etc.) as counseling and human service professionals who situate their work within cultural, family, and community (local, regional, national, and global) contexts.
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ACCREDITATION AND CERTIFICATION

The B. S. Program in Counseling and Human Services received full national accreditation in 2006 from the Council for Standards in Human Services Education (CSHSE). The Program is accredited through October 2016. The Council for Standards in Human Services Education (CSHSE) and the National Organization for Human Services (NOHS) work side by side to shape the future of human services. While CSHSE is the standard setting and approval body, NOHS is the professional organization for students, educators and providers.

All students graduating with a B.S. in Counseling and Human Services will meet all of the educational and experiential requirements to pursue the Human Services Board Certified Professional credential. This national certification is provided by the National Organization for Human Services (NOHS).

The undergraduate program in Counseling and Human Services strives to adhere to the training and ethical standards set forth by both the Council for Standards in Human Service Education (CSHSE), the National Organization for Human Services (NOHS), and the American Counseling Association (ACA). The ethical guidelines provide a framework and the theoretical underpinning to train culturally competent human services professionals. CHS program and faculty are also committed to ensuring that the curriculum, field work and clinical training experiences adhere to the ethical guidelines provided by both NOHS and ACA.
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UNIQUE DIMENSIONS OF THE PROGRAM

There are unique dimensions of the CHS major which allow undergraduate students to integrate interests and skills.  An overall strength of the B.S. Counseling and Human Services program is the congruence of its mission statement with the missions of the University, College of Professional Studies, and the Department of Counseling and Human Services. The program embraces the tradition of excellence that is part of the University community in promoting personal and professional development of its students in training human services professionals.

The sequence of courses focuses on understanding normal and abnormal human adjustment across the lifespan and on developing skill in interventions designed to maximize human adjustment and development. Core requirements in the major emphasize values, knowledge and skills common to all fields of human services, while electives allow students to develop competence in assisting specific populations.

The program allies itself to the commitment of the College of Professional Studies' mission to train students through a balance of theory and practice and community service learning experiences that are a vital part of the CHS curriculum. The Counseling and Human Services curriculum is designed to develop in students the values, knowledge, and skills necessary to become culturally competent professionals. New and ongoing curricular innovations such as the concentration in Rehabilitation Services provide Counseling and Human Services majors with more employment and graduate study options.
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SERVICE LEARNING

Another unique component of the program and the College of Professional Studies is the service learning requirement for all students. A service learning component is integrated into selected CHS courses to enhance intentional reflection for all of the students on their service learning experiences.  All students within the major are required to complete a minimum of 70 hours plus PCPS TAPESTRY requirements in order to graduate. Service learning exposes students to additional fieldwork experience within human services settings.
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MAJOR COURSES & ADVISEMENT

Students who seek a B.S. degree in Counseling and Human Services are afforded the opportunity to design a program of study to fit their individual career goals and aspirations. Students who choose to complete the B.S. program in the traditional form will take the following major courses:

CHS 111        3.0  Introduction to Human Adjustment
CHS 112        3.0  Human Services Systems
CHS 241        3.0  Case Management and Interviewing
CHS 242        3.0  Theories of Counseling
CHS 293        3.0  Research Methods in CHS
CHS 333        3.0  Multiculturalism in CHS
CHS 335        3.0  Administration in Human Services
CHS 340        1.0  Career Seminar
CHS 341        3.0  Group Dynamics
CHS 380        3.0  Internship in CHS
CHS 441        3.0  Crisis Intervention
CHS 481        3.0  Advanced Internship in CHS

Elective courses can be selected based on the student’s interests and/or career aspirations. Many students choose to select specific areas of counseling such as addictions and substance abuse, marriage and family, or special populations. Elective decisions are commonly made after exploration with the student’s department mentor or academic advisor in the College of Professional Studies (CPS) or College of Graduate and Continuing Education Advising Centers. Students in the traditional College are advised by the College of Professional Studies Advising Center. Adult learners are advised by the College of Graduate and Continuing Education Advising Center. CHS student mentoring is conducted by Drs. Paul Datti and Elizabeth Jacob.
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CONCENTRATION IN REHABILITATION SERVICES

The Counseling and Human Services curriculum has expanded to offer a concentration in rehabilitation services to enhance the knowledge and practice for work with persons with disabilities in response to an increasing need for baccalaureate-level professionals in rehabilitation services. Through a concentration in rehabilitation services, students will be prepared to work in state and local agencies that are responsible for the vocational, mental health, psycho-social, and developmental needs of persons with various types of physical and mental disabilities. Students can also pursue an emphasis on persons with addictions and substance abuse. This concentration is for Counseling and Human Services majors only. For more information, please visit the catalog website, or contact Dr. Paul Datti (paul.datti@scranton.edu or 570-941-4127)
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ACCELERATED BACHELORS/MASTERS PROGRAM

Outstanding Counseling and Human Services majors are eligible for consideration in this program, where students are able to begin graduate studies during their undergraduate career. Clinical Mental Health Counseling, Rehabilitation Counseling and School Counseling are graduate programs available for students of high academic quality and clear professional goals. Each graduate program is nationally accredited, and the Department of Counseling and Human Services is recognized regionally and nationally in Counselor Education. For more information, please visit Accelerated B.S./M.S. Degree's Website

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INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCES

During the course of academic study, CHS students are also required to apply theory into practice throughout courses and via fieldwork and internships. This clinical training is accomplished in three ways: opportunities in the department’s David W. Hall Counseling Training Center, service learning community partners, and external site Internships.

The Counseling and Human Services curriculum features two required internships. The first 150-hour internship (CHS 380) is normally taken in the Spring semester of the student’s junior year. Students are also required to complete another 200-hour internship (CHS 481), typically taken in the student's senior year. Students must complete 350 hours of internship to meet the new accreditation guidelines provided by CSHSE. Internships are not offered during Intersession or Summer sessions. The 70 hours of service learning plus PCPS TAPESTRY requirements are separate and are necessary for all undergraduate students in the College of Professional Studies to meet graduation requirements.

Students have opportunities to experience working in community mental health agencies; hospital social work departments; hospice centers; children and youth agencies; residential treatment centers for children, adolescents and adults; substance abuse facilities (inpatient and outpatient); early intervention programs; and agencies that serve persons with disabilities.
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EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK & OCCUPATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

According to the National Organization for Human Services (NOHS), the Human Services profession is dedicated to providing services to individuals and families in need of assistance. The goal of human services work is to enhance the quality of life for those who are served. Human service professionals perform a variety of roles. Some of these roles are:

  • counselor to those who need support
  • broker to help people use community resources
  • teacher of daily living skills
  • advocate for those who are unable to advocate for themselves
  • mediator between clients and between clients and agencies
  • caregiver to children, elders, and adults with disabilities  

The Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH), published by the Department of Labor, projects that opportunities for social and human service  professionals are expected to be excellent, particularly for applicants with appropriate postsecondary education. The number of social and human service jobs is projected to grow by 28% for all occupations between 2010 and 2020-ranking the occupation growing faster than average. Many additional job opportunities will arise from the need to replace workers who advance into new positions, retire, or leave the workforce for other reasons.

The OOH lists the following as examples of jobs available for those who have earned a human service degree:

Case Worker
Family Support Worker
Child Abuse Worker
Youth Worker
Social Service Liaison
Mental Health Aide
Residential Counselor
Behavioral Management Aide
Intake Interviewer
Group Activities Aide
Crisis Intervention Counselor
Probation Officer
Case Monitor
Community Outreach Worker
Parole Officer
Rehabilitation Case Worker
Child Advocate
Community Action Worker
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STUDENT RESOURCES

The CHS undergraduate program is committed to training human services professionals who will excel in their careers. Resources are available for students to facilitate professional identity development and academic success. The following resources are important avenues of information and support services for all students in the CHS major and department:

•    Fitness for the Profession

The CHS department faculty is ultimately responsible for assessing each student’s personal and professional fit for the major and the human services profession. The academic and personal standards for undergraduate CHS students are provided in the department’s “Fitness for the Profession” policy. All students will be responsible for adhering to the standards as part of their professional identity development.

•    CHS Program Manual

The CHS program manual is available for all majors. Students can access the program manual via the website here or in hard copy form from the Department. It is expected that all CHS majors and minors become familiar with the academic/curricular procedures and policies, additional information and all of the requirements for graduation.

•    Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence (CTLE)

The University of Scranton’s Center for Teaching & Learning Excellence encourages and supports a strong culture of teaching, learning and scholarship in the Ignatian Tradition for a diverse University community. The University’s CTLE works with faculty and students to help create an environment that encourages and supports student learning, faculty enrichment, instructional design, and the use of technology. 
 
•    Statement of Reasonable Accommodations for Students

Students are encouraged to make an appointment with their course instructors to review any course related concerns, needs, and/or the possibility of a reasonable accommodation.  In order to receive appropriate accommodations, students with disabilities must register with the Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence and provide relevant documentation. Students should contact Mary Ellen Pichiarello (Extension 4039) or Jim Muniz (Extension 4218) to schedule an appointment

•    University of Scranton Undergraduate Catalog
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HONOR SOCIETY
Tau Upsilon Alpha (Epsilon Chapter)

The Department of Counseling and Human Services successfully began its first National Honor Society for the B.S. program. The founding members were inducted during our inaugural induction in May 2008. The Tau Upsilon Alpha (TUA) National Honor Society is sponsored by the National Organization for Human Services and the EPSILON Chapter is available to recognize academic excellence of undergraduate Counseling and Human Services students.

The Epsilon Chapter of TUA supports the mission of NOHS “to honor academic excellence; to foster lifelong learning, leadership and development; and to promote excellence in service to humanity.”

Please contact Dr. Elizabeth Jacob, Faculty Moderator for TUA, for information and the criteria for membership: elizabeth.jacob@scranton.edu
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COUNSELING AND HUMAN SERVICES ASSOCIATION (CHSA)

CHS majors are automatic members and are encouraged to participate in the undergraduate Counseling and Human Services Association that is comprised of CHS majors and others interested in counseling and human service issues, topics, and activities.  The Association elects officers annually, meets monthly, participates in community service, and sponsors fund raising activities and educational initiatives across the campus and within the local community.  The Department of Counseling and Human Services has a list-serve that provides pertinent information relative to the CHSA and other department announcements.
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