Freshmen Seminar - What is it?

Volume 10, Number 4 
Summer '01

The Freshmen Seminar is a one credit course (Intd 100) which is taken in the first semester of freshman year. It is taught by business faculty and professional staff in the Kania School of Management and integrates student learning, university involvement, and student development. The goal of the seminar is to develop self-directed reflective learners.

WHAT ARE ITS OBJECTIVES?

Many freshmen are unaware of the skills that will contribute to academic success at the university level such as time management, note taking, effective reading techniques, and other study skills. This seminar will introduce students to the changes they may need to make in their study habits in the transition from high school to the University environment. It will teach them how to access the many resources available to them.

The KSOM Academic Advising Center staff work closely with students so they can take full advantage of the University resources. The seminar will help students understand their role in the advising process. It will include discussions on how to clarify personal goals and meet the challenges of the University. Further, it will identify student organizations and extracurricular activities that are personally relevant to the individual student.

WHO HAS TO TAKE IT?

All KSOM freshmen are required to take the Freshman Seminar, as well as freshmen in CAS and CPS.

KSOM freshmen with a declared major will begin to identify with their department. They will meet faculty and learn about required courses and careers associated with the major.

Freshmen in the general area of business will learn about all the majors in KSOM and job opportunities available to graduates of a business school. We want them to choose a college major that is right for the individual student.

WHY IS IT NECESSARY?

Students will understand the interactive effects of lifestyle decisions and behavior choices on academics, relationships, and health.

Jesuit higher education is more than taking classes and making grades. The nature of the Jesuit identity requires development of the whole student, so that each may reach his/her full potential.