Kevin Nordberg, Ph.D.

Kevin-Final.jpg

Professor

Office:  LSC 560

Phone:  570.941.7748

Email:  kevin.nordberg@scranton.edu


I received my BA degree from Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts with majors in French, Natural Science and Philosophy. I earned an MA and PhD in Philosophy at Notre Dame University in Indiana and have been a member of the faculty at the University of Scranton since 1970. I would describe my interests as interdisciplinary and evolving.

In philosophy my early interest was in ancient and medieval philosophy, but I wrote my doctoral dissertation on the topic of philosophy of history in the writings of R.G. Collingwood, a twentieth century thinker.

I studied modern French philosophy and literature in an NEH summer seminar at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Later during a sabbatical I did research on related topics at the Universityé de Dijon in France.

My interests became even more interdisciplinary when I began studying computer science, taught computer-assisted drawing and design here at the University of Scranton for about 12 years and won several Ben Franklin Partnership Grants to help several local construction trade companies computerize their operations. That work led eventually to the development of a course on the relationship of information technology and ethical issues, legal issues, privacy, intellectual property, etc.

About ten years ago I started studying Spanish and became interested in Latin American thought. For five years I participated as co-leader in the January Guadalajara study trip establish some years earlier by Dr. Robert Parsons of the World Languages and Cultures Department.

My current repertory of courses includes Introduction to Philosophy; Early Modern Philosophy; Computers and Ethics; and Latin American Thought.

For the last several years I have been proud to serve as an officer of our union, the Faculty Affair Council, in an effort to make university life as rewarding for others as it has been for me.

Socrates said that the unexamined life is not worth living. Surely, a life lived at a university, surrounded by women and men who make a serious attempt to live the life of the mind, must be one of the best places to seek a life worth living.

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