Philosophy Minor

Ron Teaching

There are a number of reasons for choosing to minor in philosophy.  A major area of study often raises questions about values or methodology that philosophy can explore; so philosophy can deepen your understanding of your major field.  In addition, philosophy trains a person to think rigorously about fundamental questions, to express ideas clearly and logically, to understand and evaluate conflicting points of view, and to reason in a careful way. These intellectual skills are useful in almost any career.

All undergraduates take two required philosophy courses (Introduction to Philosophy and Ethics -- PHIL 120 and 210), plus one additional course in either philosophy or theology.  Because a minor in philosophy requires six philosophy courses in all, a student who pursues a minor would only have to take three courses in addition to the general education requirements to earn the degree.  Minors in philosophy have a choice of six thematic minors in addition to a general or open minor. The purpose of minors in philosophy is to allow students to integrate philosophy into their studies. The thematic minors in particular invite students to link philosophy to some other major area or topic of interest to them.



MINOR #1: The Open Minor in Philosophy

  • 
PHIL 120, Introduction to Philosophy
  • 
PHIL 210, Ethics

  • Plus four other courses in Philosophy


MINOR #2: Ethical Issues in Professional Life 


  • PHIL 120, Introduction to Philosophy 

  • PHIL 210, Ethics
  • 
PHIL 211, Business Ethics
  • 
PHIL 212, Medical Ethics
  • 
PHIL 213, Environmental Ethics
  • 
PHIL 214, Computers and Ethics 

  • PHIL 313, Philosophy and Friendship

MINOR #3: Philosophy and Commercial Life 


  • PHIL 120, Introduction to Philosophy 

  • PHIL 210, Ethics 

  • PHIL 211, Business Ethics
  • 
PHIL 213, Environmental Ethics 

  • PHIL 215, Logic 

  • PHIL 238, Wealth and the Human Good


MINOR #4: Pre-Law Minor in Philosophy 

  • PHIL 120, Introduction to Philosophy 

  • PHIL 210, Ethics 

  • PHIL 215, Logic
  • 
PHIL 319, Philosophy of Law 

  • Plus two courses from the following list: 

    • PHIL 213, Environmental Ethics 

    • PHIL 214, Computers and Ethics
    • 
PHIL 227, Political Philosophy
    • 
PHIL 315, Twentieth Century Political Philosophy


MINOR #5: History of Philosophy 

  • 
PHIL 120, Introduction to Philosophy
  • 
PHIL 210, Ethics
  • 
PHIL 220, Ancient Philosophy 

  • PHIL 221, Medieval Philosophy 

  • Plus one modern course and one other elective from the following list: 

    • PHIL 218, Feminism, Theory and Practice 

    • PHIL 222, Modern I
    • 
PHIL 223, Modern II
    • 
PHIL 224, Foundations of Twentieth Century Philosophy
    • 
PHIL 225, Asian Philosophy 

    • PHIL 226, Chinese Philosophy 

    • PHIL 234, Existentialism
    • 
PHIL 236, Freud and Philosophy
    • 
PHIL 242, Latin American Thought
    • 
PHIL 312, Modern III
    • 
PHIL 327, Readings in the Later Plato 

    • PHIL 340, Philosophy and Judaism 

    • PHIL 411, Thomas Aquinas: Philosophy and Controversy 

    • PHIL 414, Philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas 

    • PHIL 418, Phenomenology
    • 
PHIL 425, Postmodern Philosophy


MINOR #6: Philosophy and Religious Life 


  • PHIL 120, Introduction to Philosophy 

  • PHIL 210, Ethics 

  • PHIL 215, Logic
  • 
PHIL 221, Medieval Philosophy 

  • PHIL 229, Philosophy of Religion
  • 
Plus one course from the following list:
    • 
PHIL 333, Seven Deadly Sins 

    • PHIL 336, Religion after God
    • 
PHIL 340, Philosophy and Judaism 

    • PHIL 411, Thomas Aquinas: Philosophy and Controversy


MINOR #7: Philosophy and Science 

  • 
PHIL 120, Introduction to Philosophy 

  • PHIL 210, Ethics
  • 
PHIL 215, Logic
  • 
Plus three courses from the following list:
    • 
PHIL 213, Environmental Ethics 

    • PHIL 214, Computers and Ethics
    • 
PHIL 384, Philosophy and the City 

    • PHIL 430, Philosophy of the Social Sciences
    • 
PHIL 431, Philosophy of Science
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